News

SOCIETY OF LEATHER TECHNOLOGISTS AND CHEMISTS CONFERENCE 2020

28 March 2020

Indigenous Arctic Fish Skin: A study of different traditional skin processing technology 

Elisa Palomino, Central St Martins, University of the Arts, London

Gustavo Adrian Defeo, Ars Tinctoria

Lotta Rahme, independent tanner

http://www.sltc.org/latest-sltc-conference/



News

CRAFT CONFERENCE 2019 FISH SKIN SUSTAINABILITY CRAFT AND MATERIAL INNOVATION

05 November 2019

Craft Conference 2019 - Elisa Palomino, Lotta Rahme

 "Fish skin: sustainability, craft and material innovation and its application

https://www.uttv.ee/naita?id=29188



News

A FISH SKIN CLUTCH COLLECTION USING OCEAN FOOD WASTE WHILE PRESERVING THE PLANNET’S NATURAL RESOURCES

24 October 2019

WORTH PROJECT

THE CHALLENGE

The project aims to introduce concepts such as the sustainability and craft innovation of the fish leather in the luxury industry with the final aim of substituting the luxury leather- based products while preserving ancient and innovative techniques. The technological challenge was to pilot and develop new technologies, based on artwork development for fish leather finishes together with a high component of design (inspired by Asian cultures), promoting development of future manufactured fish skin leather new products for the luxury industry.

The object of the project is the preservation and dissemination of cultural heritage connected with fish skin. The collaboration and cooperation among the Icelandic tannery and fashion designer, is a fine example of an innovative way of linking the preservation of traditional knowledge and culture and the development of culturally relevant fashion items taking in consideration the sustainable limits of the planet’s natural resources.

THE SOLUTION

Making leather from fish skin is an ancient craft historically used by many Arctic coastal cultures.The Fishskinlab clutch collection combines the technological progress of Atlantic Leather, an Icelandic tannery leading in manufacturing leather from fish skin with the designs of Elisa Palomino, a recognised international fashion designer. Fishskinlab presents a clutch collection inspired by the principles of sustainability.

https://www.worthproject.eu/project/fishskinlab/


News

FISHSKIN NETWORK EVENT IN ICELAND

17 September 2019

Participants of FISHskin 2019, international fish skin craft workshop and conference held at the Textile Center in September 2019. The program is a collaboration of Elisa Palomino (fourth on the left, middle row) & partners, including the Icelandic University of the Arts.

https://www.textilmidstod.is/en/moya/gallery/index/index/textilmidstod-islands/vinnustofur-workshops/group-picture-fishskin2019



FISHSKINLAB

Elisa Palomino’s research investigates the Sustainability and Craft innovation of Fish Leather in the luxury Industry and Higher Education. She has gained 30 years of experience working in the luxury fashion Industry and her practice-based research draws into her experience working with fish leather at John Galliano and Christian Dior in 2002.

The project aims to promote the use of sustainable fish leather and seeks to inspire, educate and inform designers, creators, and consumers about its beauty, quality, versatility and sustainability. The project will look at intelligent ways of using ocean food waste for the development of fashionable leather articles. The aim is to turn ocean waste into higher-value products.

The use of fish skin for the construction of garments and accessories is an ancient tradition shared by coastal Arctic societies as a subsistence lifestyle depending on aquatic resources for food and clothing. Arctic Indigenous Peoples need formidable resourcefulness to thrive in inhospitable ecosystems; fish skins provide them physical and spiritual protection . During the last century, they resisted not only colonization and repression by humans but also dramatic ecological changes in seafood security. Fish skin craft became a way to communicate traditional knowledge where practical benefits combined cultural resilience . As market goods have replaced traditional fish skin clothing, the need for the skills required to create these items have diminished. The decrease of local natural resources also threatens the craft.

The focus of this research is primarily to propose a vision of sustainability as an anthropological study of the resourcefulness and resilience of the Arctic Indigenous Peoples, their lifestyles, and fish skin practices. Secondarily it identifies the historical, cultural, environmental, and socio-economic importance of fish skin as an innovative sustainable material, explored through the study of materials, processes and artefact analysis. Thirdly, the application of fish skin materials and craft practices has been tested through participatory workshops to explore how this material and the skill transmissions can contribute to sustainability practices in fashion.

This project is centred on the research questions:

• What can be learnt from the use of fish skin by Artic Indigenous peoples, their resilience and resourcefulness, and its connection with contemporary sustainable fashion practices?

• How can the development and testing of traditional Arctic fish skin material and craft contribute to fashion and sustainability?

The project brings contribution to the knowledge of a renewed raw material for the leather industry. Information regarding traditional tanning methods enriches the insufficient knowledge in this area and provides a new contribution to fashion sustainability.

 The mapping and visualisation of fish skin craft participatory practices with Artic Indigenous communities forms a secondary contribution, as this is the first time that such a survey has been undertaken.